The wild horse Mustang

Mustang is a wild horse. Mustangs are descended from horses, brought by the colonists to the New World from Europe in the sixteenth century. Many of the horses brought here, fought back from people and ran wild: some fled from the pastures, others received freedom by loss of their rider in battle.

The wild horse Mustang

Over time, their numbers increased: in the beginning of XX-th century in the American prairie there were about 2 million mustangs. Mustangs were common in the prairies of North America and are quite a popular object of hunting. They were hunted for their meat and skin. In the twentieth century hunting has reached such a scale of values that today Mustangs nearly exterminated: according to various estimates they have no more than 10-20 thousand. Another important reason for reducing the number of Mustangs was a need for new pastures for the rapidly increasing number of livestock.

The wild horse Mustang

"The Symbol of the American West" is the main name for this animal. Mustangs are known all over the world for their athleticism.

The wild horse Mustang

Horses of draft conformation are kept on separate ranges. While the Spanish blood has been diluted, many of the horses still exhibit Spanish characteristics. There has been a firmly held belief for several decades that there were no pure Spanish-type horse remaining on the ranges of the wild horse. But in recent years a few small herds have been found in very isolated areas which have been found through blood testing to be strongly related to Spanish breeding. Among these the most well-known are Kiger and Cerat Mustangs.

The wild horse Mustang

It’s very important that wild horses can be separated into groups according to their age and gender. From birth to one year, both male and females are foals. Colts and fillies are also called yearlings. A female remains a filly until she is four years old or has been bred. Fillies who are bred or reach the age of four become mares. Mares are usually three or four years old.
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