Fiordland National Park in New Zealand

Fiordland National Park in the southwest corner of the South Island of New Zealand is the largest of the 14 national parks in the country. With snowy peaks and shining fiords as well as chilly lakes and valleys, the park gives some of the best known views of New Zealand.

Fiordland National Park in New Zealand

Within the past 2 million years, this area has been covered with glaciers from time to time, craving numerous fiords. 14 fiords are spreading up to 25 mi inland. The Fiordland has steep and rocky coast, with fiords and many chains of mountains. There are some peaks reaching up to 6,561 ft height in the north of the park. The Mitre Peak is the famous 3,900 ft mountain, coming from the Milford Sound.

Fiordland National Park in New Zealand

This is the Fiordland that hosts the oldest cliffs of New Zealand, containing hard metamorphic grounds. The area is near the Alps, where two plates of earth crust meet. They rolled, came across, rose and went down many times.

Fiordland National Park in New Zealand

The ice carved islands from the continent as well as some large lakes within the park, including Lake Te Anau, Lake Manapouri, Lake Monowai and Lake Poteriteri. The Sutherland Falls, to the southwest of Milford Sound are among the world's highest waterfalls.

Fiordland National Park in New Zealand

Prevailing westerly winds blow moist air from the Tasman Sea onto the mountains; the cooling of this air as it rises produces a prodigious amount of precipitations, feeding moderate rainforests of the park. The Fiordland was the territory of local people Maori and deeply reflected in their legends and traditions.

Fiordland National Park in New Zealand

James Cook with his team was the first of the Europeans who visited the Fiordland in 1773. They spent 5 weeks here, making detailed maps and descriptions. It was Cook’s maps that brought seal hunters and whalers to this region, and they became the first European settlers in New Zealand.

Fiordland National Park in New Zealand

From mid-19th century, researchers started thoroughly studying local places. In 1980s, they found gold in one of caves, and the region faced a short-lived gold rush. The early settlers Donald Sutherland and Quintin McKinnon launched a Milford Trail in 1889; this is the world’s known route now.

Fiordland National Park in New Zealand

Fiordland National Park was officially established in 1952. At present, it covers 1.2 million ha area. The park also hosts Te Wahipounamu, the UNESCO world heritage added to the list in 1986.
The park is mostly planted with southern beech and red mountain beech surrounding eastern lakes and valleys. Silver beech also can be found. The wet regions are full of bushes, ferns, mosses and lichens. At the height of 330 ft above the ground, Alpine daisy, buttercups and other herbs can be found. The National Park is home for numerous wild animals both local and moved in. If you catch the luck, you will see kakapo, the only flightless parrot in the world.

Fiordland National Park in New Zealand

The Fiordland is also working on recruitment of Takahe, a unique bird that was considered as completely disappeared specie. After Takahe had been rediscovered in Murchison Mountains in 1948, it was created a 5,300 sq ft area in the park to save the birds.
100%  |  22  |  Feb 21, 2017
Back
Forward
Close